MS. CROWLEY
MR. GUEVIN
MS. PEREZ
MR. WITMAN

8th Grade Science

The 8th grade research project is an opportunity for students to understand the role and importance of research in our world and apply the scientific method to a topic of their choice.

 

Students work in small groups and started by developing a research question with the guidance of Honors Research Students. Groups then created a procedure of their own design, had it approved by an Institutional Review Board, and independently carried out data collection to help answer their question. 

Below you can explore project abstracts, pdf posters, and video introductions from each group.

Research Projects

Ela D.,

Emily L.,

Ella G.,

Grace O.

Is Kinesthetic, Visual or Auditory the Most Effective Teaching Style?

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Violet A.

Reese D.

Amelia G.

Christina O.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Kallie D.,

Emmi M.,

Wyeth R.,

Reilly J.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.

Jiya P.,

Ciara L.,

Juliet M.,

Hailey W.

Madelyn N.

The Effects of Feminism on Short-Term Resilience of Female-Identifying Students

Our group’s goal was to see if feelings of certain songs affect your heart rate while listening to them. The reason we were all attracted to this project was because we were looking to find a way to change your mood through a bit of music. After purchasing PASCO Heart Rate Monitors and recruiting Marlborough student volunteers, we were ready to start the project. In this experiment, we asked twenty volunteers to pick a song they found calming and a song they found exciting. Using the software Capstone, we tracked each participant’s heart rate for both the two songs as well as with no songs playing (for a control group). When we put all the data together and looked at the results, we discovered that their heart rate tended to decrease when listening to calm music. The results for the exciting music were less clear. As our participants’ physical actions, such as singing and dancing, could’ve affected our results, a potential future project would be to see if there’s a correlation between physical responses to a song and heart rate.